Stafford/Fredericksburg: 540-288-8585
Caroline: 804-448-1170
N. Richmond: 804-550-9005

Treating for ticks in and outside of the home

  • Two interior and exterior treatments within 30 days.
  • Exterior service to include installation of termite monitors to aid in the detection of termites.
  • Exterior applications target pest activity and include treatments around windows, doors, overhangs and under siding, as well as sealing ground level pest entry points.
  • Followed by exterior treatment every other month; includes rodent protection, interior treatment and IPM inspection report in the winter months.
  • Inside service available upon request at no additional charge.

Get to know ticks before they get to know you

  • American Dog Tick: The American dog tick gets its name from the fact that adult ticks prefer domestic dogs as hosts, and this tick species is only found in North America.
    Learn more
    • Color: Brown with whitish to gray markings
    • Legs: Larvae have 6 legs, nymphs and adults have 8 legs
    • Shape: Oval and robust
    • Size: 3/16″ (5 mm) unengorged, 5/8″ (15 mm) engorged
    • Antennae: No
    • Region: Found throughout the U.S., except the Rocky Mountains area

    Habits: It is thought that American dog ticks are attracted by the scent of animals, so they are common along roads and trails. Adult ticks prefer domestic dogs as hosts and can therefore be brought into the home and potentially transferred to humans.

    Habitat:These ticks prefer grassy areas with low vegetation where larger mammals pass by. American dog ticks do not survive well indoors.

    Threats:The American dog tick is the primary vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the United States. It is also known to transmit tularemia, a rare bacterial infection, and cause tick paralysis.

    Prevention: When in an area where ticks are common, wear long sleeved shirts and pants, preferably light colored so ticks will be easy to detect. Tuck pants into socks, and use a tick repellent when outside. To get rid of ticks and limit risks indoors, inspect clothing and skin when heading inside. Wash clothes immediately.

    If a tick is found on the body, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp it as close to the skin’s surface as possible. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick as this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. Once the tick is removed, thoroughly clean the bite site with soap and water. Then, flush the tick down the toilet or wrap it in a tissue before disposing in a closed receptacle.

  • Blacklegged Deer Ticks: A notorious biting arachnid, the blacklegged tick is named for its dark legs, which are in contrast to its pale body. Blacklegged ticks are sometimes called deer ticks.
    Learn more
    • Color: Orange-brown with dark legs
    • Legs: 8
    • Shape: Flat; broad oval
    • Size: 1/8″
    • Antennae: No
    • Region: Found primarily in the northeastern, mid-Atlantic, southeastern and north central regions of the U.S.

    Habits: During the winter, adult ticks feed primarily on the blood of white-tailed deer, which is why they are sometimes called deer ticks. In the spring, a female tick will drop off its host and will deposit about 3,000 eggs. Nymphs, or baby ticks, feed on mice, squirrels, raccoons, skunks, dogs, humans and birds.

    Habitat:Blacklegged ticks prefer to hide in grass and shrubs while waiting for a passing host.

    Threats:Blacklegged ticks or deer ticks are a vector of anaplasmosis, babeosis and Lyme disease. Lyme disease is a primary concern in the United States. Symptoms of Lyme disease include fever, headache, fatigue and a characteristic bull’s eye-shaped skin rash. Lyme disease can also affect joints, the heart and the nervous system if left untreated.

    Prevention: When in an area where ticks are common, wear long-sleeved shirts and pants, preferably light-colored so ticks will be easy to detect. It’s also important to wear a tick repellent containing at least 20 percent DEET. To get rid of ticks and their risks indoors, inspect clothing and skin when heading inside. If you find a tick, remove it with a slow and steady pull. Consult with a doctor immediately if there is a reaction at the bite site or if you believe you have contracted Lyme disease. To address ticks on your property, contact a tick control professional.

  • Lone Star Ticks: Norway rats are believed to be of Asian origin, but are now found throughout the world. These rats can cause damage to properties and structures through their gnawing. Norway rats have smaller eyes and ears and shorter tails.
    Learn more
    • Color: Reddish brown, becoming slate gray when engorged
    • Legs: Larvae have 6 legs, nymphs and adults have 8 legs
    • Shape: Oval, flattened
    • Size: Females are 1/6-1/4″ (4-6 mm) un-engorged and 1/2″ (16 mm) engorged; Males are smaller
    • Antennae: No
    • Region: West central Texas northward to northern Missouri and eastward from Maine to the southern tip of Florida

    Habits: Norway rats are primarily nocturnal and often enter a home in the fall when outside food sources become scarce. These rats are known to gnaw through almost anything “ including plastic or lead pipes to obtain food or water. Norway rats are social rodents and build burrows close to one another.

    Habitat:Outdoors, Norway rats live in fields, farmlands and in structures. These rats frequently burrow in soil near riverbanks, in garbage and woodpiles, and under concrete slabs. Indoors, Norway rats often nest in basements, piles of debris or undisturbed materials. Rodents can gain entry to a home through a hole the size of a quarter.

    Threats:Norway rats can cause damage to structures through their gnawing and eating. These rats are also vectors of diseases including plague, jaundice, rat-bite fever, cowpox virus, trichinosis and salmonellosis. In addition, Norway rats can contaminate food and introduce fleas into a home.

    Prevention: Norway rats are often drawn to piles of wood, so homeowners should keep firewood stored well away from the structure and remove debris piles to reduce nesting spots. For proper Norway rat control, seal any holes on the outside of the home with silicone caulk. Eliminate sources of moisture, especially in crawl spaces and basements, to get rid of Norway rats. It’s also important to occasionally inspect the home for signs of a Norway rat infestation, including rodent droppings, gnaw marks, damaged goods and greasy rub marks caused by their oily fur.

  • Brown Dog Ticks: The brown dog tick is named for its color and because it is found on domestic dogs. Although it is unusual for a brown dog tick to bite humans, it will do so in the absence of a canine host.
    Learn more
    • Color: Reddish brown, gray-blue when engorged
    • Legs: Larvae have 6 legs, nymphs and adults have 8 legs
    • Shape: Oval, flattened
    • Size: 1/8″ (3 mm) unengorged; 1/2″ (12 mm) engorged
    • Antennae: No
    • Region: Found throughout the U.S.

    Habits: Brown dog ticks prefer dogs as hosts. They typically attach to the ears or between the toes and do not travel very far after dropping off a host. They are unique because they can complete their entire life cycle indoors.

    Habitat:This tick survives best indoors and prefers warm, dry conditions.

    Threats:Brown dog ticks rarely attack humans, but they can transmit Rocky Mountain spotted fever and several other tick-borne diseases to dogs including canine ehrlichiosis and canine babesia.

    Prevention: The best way to prevent brown dog ticks is cleanliness. Keeping pet areas clean and free of debris can help locate engorged ticks looking to lay eggs and remove them from the house. Pet treatment is also an important prevention tool. Pets should be treated with flea and tick repellent as necessary.

    If a tick is found on the body, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp it as close to the skin’s surface as possible. Pull upward with steady, even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick as this can cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin. Once the tick is removed, thoroughly clean the bite site with soap and water. Then, flush the tick down the toilet or wrap it in a tissue before disposing in a closed receptacle.

  • Rocky Mountain Ticks: The Rocky Mountain wood tick - also known more simply as the wood tick - gets its name from its primary distribution in the Rocky Mountain states and its preferred habitat of wooded areas.
    Learn more
    • Color: Brown, becoming grayish when engorged
    • Legs: Larvae have 6 legs, nymphs and adults have 8 legs
    • Shape: Oval, flattened
    • Size: 1/8″(3.2 mm) un-engorged; 5/8″ (16.5mm) engorged
    • Antennae: No
    • Region: Rocky Mountain states.

    Habits: Similar to the lone star tick, the Rocky Mountain wood tick is considered a three-host tick because each feeding stage requires a different host. This tick species becomes active with the first warm days of spring, usually feeding from mid-March to mid-July – when humans are most susceptible to wood tick-related diseases. Larvae and nymphs feed mainly on rodents such as voles, chipmunks and squirrels. Adults prefer to feed on medium to large animal hosts including sheep, deer and humans.

    Habitat: Rocky Mountain wood ticks are usually found in wooded areas with low-growing vegetation, open grasslands and around trails. This tick is found at higher densities at lower elevation. This environment helps them easily attach to a passing host that brushes against the vegetation. Nymphs and adults overwinter in ground debris.

    Threats: The Rocky Mountain wood tick is a primary vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, a severe infectious disease with a mortality rate of more than 20 percent. A tick needs to be attached for more than two hours before the disease is transmitted, so early detection is key. The main symptom is a full body rash that develops 2-5 days after the bite. This tick species can also transmit Colorado tick fever and tularemia, and is known to cause tick paralysis when it feeds for at least 5-6 days.

    Prevention: Outdoors, experts recommend wearing tick repellent and long-sleeved clothes. Homeowners should keep grass cut low and ensure weeds and woodpiles are removed.

    if a tick is found on the body, use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp it as close to the skin’s surface as possible. Then, pull upward with steady, even pressure and avoid twisting or jerking the tick as this can cause the mouthparts to break off and remain in the skin. Once the tick is removed, thoroughly clean the bite site with soap and water. Then, flush the tick down the toilet or wrap it tightly in a tissue before disposing in a closed receptacle. If you develop a rash, headaches, pains or fever, call a doctor immediately.